A short interlude

Reviews

I’m aware that it’s over three weeks since I last posted on Crimepieces.  First of all, to make my excuses, here’s what I’ve been up to. I’ve been finishing the first draft of my fourth book. The photo doesn’t give much away, I’m afraid, even the title but it’ll be the fourth book in my DC Connie Childs series. The narrative is split between the present day and the 1950s and it’s been fascinating to research this interesting decade.

At Crimefest in Bristol the 2017 Petrona Award for Scandinavian crime fiction was presented to Gunnar Staalesen for Where Roses Never Die. A really excellent book. I’ve now started to read for the 2018 award, beginning with The Thirst by Jo Nesbo. It’s a substantial book at 537 pages and Nesbo is always eminently readable. Translated by Neil Smith, the prose has you turning the page but, be warned, it’s the most violent Nesbo yet. The killer has a way of dispatching his victims that’s gruesome in the extreme and Nesbo cleverly uses the rise of social media, and Tinder in particular, to frightening effect. Lovers of Harry Hole will  be delighted but it won’t be for everyone.

I’ve also read two new books, one coming later this month and one early next year. Both were excellent. Kathy Reichs is best known for her series featuring forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan. Two Nights marks a departure for her.  Her new protagonist, Sunnie Knight, is an ex police officer who is hired by a wealthy woman looking for her granddaughter. A bomb explosion killed other members of the family but the girl was lost in the confusion. Sunny heads to Chicago with enemies on her trail to track down the girl. The book is different in style and tone from Reich’s other books and is perfect for fans of Sue Grafton and Sara Paretsky. Her new protagonist will easily carry a new series and I’m looking forward to reading more. Two Nights is out on the 29th June.

I then had a reading break as a number of books I picked up were put down again, unable to get beyond the first couple of pages. We all go through reading slumps like this, I guess. However, mine was revived by an excellent book, The Confession by Jo Spain. It’s a bit naughty including it here, as it’s not out until next year but it really is excellent. A woman watches her husband being brutally attacked and the next day the assailant hands himself in. We know who did it but not why and the narrative gradually reveals the reason behind the attack. I won’t say any more except that you’re in for a treat next year.  It was a delight to read. You can follow Jo Spain on Twitter @SpainJoanne.

I hope I’ve managed to pique your interest about some of these books including mine! We’ve three months to wait until A Patient Fury is out but I have some lovely things happening around that time. More soon.

I’ll also be appearing this month in the British Library at the Bodies from the Library event to talk about Elizabeth Daly. I’m a big fan and if any readers of Crimepieces are too do please let me know.

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Review: Jo Nesbo – Blood on Snow

Reviews

517Sl6iwsUL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_I’m a big fan of Jo Nesbo’s books. I know he’s not to everyone’s taste but I love the sheer readability of what he produces and, if I’m to be honest, the bloody nature of his narratives. He’s best known, in translation at least, for his series featuring the Oslo detective Harry Hole although I also enjoyed his two standalone books, The Son and Headhunters. Now, with the publication of Blood on Snow, we have a new series to enjoy and a new translator of Nesbo’s writing into English.

 Olav is a ‘fixer’ employed by Daniel Hoffman to eliminate extraneous people from his life. When he is tasked with killing Hoffman’s wife, Olav’s only worry is whether he will be allowed to live afterwards, given the amount of dirt he now has on his employer. But when he catches sight of the beautiful Corina all thoughts of killing her disappear. He instead murders the man with whom she has been having a violent affair and sets off a chain of events that leaves him in the sights of two rival gangs.

Blood on Snow is an interesting book in that it provides many of the things we as readers demand from Nesbo. There’s often a lack of demarcation between the hunter and hunted and Olav finds himself in the position of needing to kill before he is killed. Nesbo has been criticised for his excessive use of violence and there’s plenty of gore here. It’s a difficult one because it feels an essential part of Nesbo’s style of prose and therefore not gratuitous. In fact, it was the sex scenes that were slightly awkward although these were partly explained in the plot’s conclusion.

Blood on Snow is a short book at 198 pages of quite large print. But it packs in plenty of action and, unlike some of Nesbo’s more recent books, feels resolutely set in Oslo. The translation was by Neil Smith who, as I’ve mentioned before on this blog, is my favourite translator of Swedish and Norwegian crime fiction. He’s done an excellent job with this new Nesbo and is busy translating the next book in the series. This, based on the blurb, promises to be an even more appealing read.