Giveaway week – A Patient Fury Day #2

IMG_1103The e-book of A Patient Fury is out today!

To celebrate, I’m giving away the audio books of my first two DC Childs novels In Bitter Chill and A Deadly Thaw. Whole Story Audio at F W Howse have kindly donated the CDs for this competition and thanks to the lovely Ellis Moore for arranging for this. Audio books are becoming increasingly popular, I’m a big fan and listen to my favourite authors when I’m pottering around the house.

As yesterday, to enter the giveaway, all you need to do is ‘like’ my Facebook page

 

 

 

and sign-up to my newsletter below.

 

 

That’s it! If you’ve already signed up to receive my newsletter, then simply leave a comment below telling me what your favourite audio book is.

The competition will be open until Friday evening (the 8th) at 6pm BST when I’ll be drawing ALL the winners for the week and I’ll announce them here. The competition is open to entries worldwide.  Good luck and here’s a glimpse of what’s on offer for the rest of the week:

Wednesday

 

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

***The competition is now closed. Congratulations to winner Dave Gibson. Thanks to all who took part. I loved reading about your favourite audio books.***

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Review: Glass Houses by Louise Penny

images-4Like Donna Leon whose latest book, Earthly Remains, I reviewed earlier this year, Louise Penny is an author admired by both writers and readers alike who I’d never read. Glass Houses is the thirteenth book in her series featuring Chief Inspector Ganache and I was interested to see see how I’d get on with a series admired by Ann Cleeves and Peter James.

Gamache is living in Three Pines where a mysterious figure appears on the village green one November day, alarming residents who link it to the appearance of a historic cobrador who is seen when a debt is about to be collected. The discovery of a body in a church basement means Ganache is forced to investigate this local crime and face the trial of the accused.

Blog TourThe structure of Glass Houses is interesting as it begins in a courtroom on a hot July day where Ganache is giving evidence about the case. As a new reader to Penney, I was slightly disorientated at first as we dive straight in to both the background to the murder and the personality of Gamache. However, it’s a clever plot device and as Gamache recounts the tale, I became immersed in the story which is excellent, incorporating elects of both Three Pines’ history and modern day policing.

Penney writes beautifully and I can see that the comparisons to PD James aren’t superfluous not least for the wonderful descriptive prose. I’m just sorry that I came to this series so late and hope to catch up with earlier books soon.

Giveaway week – A Patient Fury Day #1

It’s publication week for my new crime novel, A Patient Fury. It comes out in e-book tomorrow and hardback on Thursday. To celebrate, I’m doing a giveaway each day until Friday of various books connected to my reviews and writing including, of course, my own novels. I’ll still be posting my reviews – I have one coming tomorrow but I though it’d be nice to celebrate too.

Today, as promised, I’m giving away a bundle of four proofs that I reviewed last week.The books are published in 2018 so the lucky winner will get early sight of these excellent crime novels by Eva Dolan, Cara Hunter, Roz Watkins and Karen Ellis. Today’s giveaway is to celebrate book reviewers who do a sterling job to promote authors and reading in general. It’s the start of the blog tour for A Patient Fury today and I’m very grateful for the support of the bloggers involved. I’ll be posting the reviews on my Facebook page.

To enter the giveaway, all you need to do is ‘like’ my Facebook page

 

 

and sign-up to my newsletter below.

 

 

That’s it! If you already receive my newsletter, then simply leave a comment below telling me what your favourite read of 2017 is so far.

The competition will be open until Friday evening (the 8th) at 6pm BST when I’ll be drawing ALL the winners for the week and I’ll announce them here. The competition is open to entries worldwide.  Good luck and here’s a glimpse of what’s on offer for the rest of the week:

Tuesday

 

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

**** The competition is now closed. Congratulations to winner Sue Leavey. Thanks to all who took part. I loved reading about your favourite book this year.*****

Classic Crime Review: Alias Basil Willing by Helen McCloy

41tEe7zfHQL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_When I spoke about Elizabeth Daly at Bodies from the Library in June, a fellow speaker, Christine Poulson, suggested I try Helen McCloy who writes in a similar vein to Daly. I already had Alias Basil Willing on my shelf, number 1251 in my vintage Penguin collection and I’ve been reading it over the last couple of days. The book has an intriguing if unlikely premise. Psychiatrist Dr Basil Willing leaves a New York tobacconist at the same time as a man who has rushed in to buy his favourite brand of cigarettes. The man hails a taxi and while giving instructions to the driver proclaims ‘I am Basil Willing.’ The real Willing, of course, follows the taxi which leads him to a three-story house in a shabby street furnished with unexpected luxury by its owner Doctor Zimmer, a fellow psychiatrist. The cast of characters (and suspects) are introduced as Willing mingles amongst them during which the fake Willing’s deception is exposed. Before he can explain the circumstances of the alias, however, he dies from an overdose of codeine.

Basil Willing is clearly a series detective but it’s a mark of McCloy’s skill that I was able to pick up his back story fairly quickly although as a protagonist I’m not sure I completely warmed to him. There’s a devilish heart to the plot though which reflects its post war setting which considers the treatment of those a burden to their husbands, children and other family members. The final part of the book left me chilled which rarely happens with modern psychological thrillers.

51FcLcMDKRLLike Daly, McCloy is excellent at depicting New York polite society and the endemic boredom which encourages drug taking and excessive alcohol. I was impressed by the fact the police didn’t appear too stupid here and the psychiatry explanations were done with a light touch which means they’re not too old-fashioned for the modern reader. I think this is the only Penguin edition of McCloy’s books but they’re available on kindle and well worth a read for the intelligent writing and strong plot.