Music To Write Books By – Nick Quantrill

nq-photoNick Quantrill joins Crimepieces today to talk about the music he writes to. Nick was born and raised in Hull, an isolated industrial city in East Yorkshire. His crime novels are published by Caffeine Nights. A prolific short story writer, Nick’s work has appeared in various volumes of “The Mammoth Book of Best British Crime”. In 2011, 51tk6mt6kdlNick became the first person to hold the role of ‘Writer in Residence’ at Hull Kingston Rovers. When not writing fiction, Nick contributes reviews and essays to a variety of football and music websites. He lives with his wife, daughter, cat and the constant fear Hull City will let him down.

Hi Nick. Do you have particular pieces of music you write to?

I have a confession to make. Although I’m a huge music fan, it doesn’t always mix well for me with writing. I’ve never had the luxury of a proper writing space, so I write with constant background noise – my daughter (aged 5), television, radio – I don’t mind. If I have music on, it tends to be something I know backwards, usually The Beatles, so it doesn’t demand too much attention.

Has a particular piece of music ever inspired you to write something?

Kind of. As much as I can point towards certain writers as being an influence, it was having friends in bands that gave me the push to write. My friends in Lithium Joe and Scarper! booked their own gigs, released their own records, sorted their own merchandise etc. It was a very clear lesson in life – if you want to do something, do it. Don’t wait for someone to give you permission.

Could you recommend any particular pieces of music for a specific mood?

I didn’t think I did this until I thought about it. Maybe it’s more a subconscious thing, but if I’m going to write an action scene, I’ll probably have some punk on – bands I was listening to as a teenager, like The Descendents or Green Day. If it’s a more reflective scene and it requires more thought, I often reach for the song-writers who can do in three minutes what we do in 90,000 words – writers like Steve Earle, John K Samson and Jeff Tweedy. Their skills are intimidating, but also very inspiring.

Are there any longer pieces you can recommend? If you need to write for an hour, for example, is there a particular composer/artist you’d chose?

I’m more likely to go back to stuff I know well with The Beatles a constant fixture. Spotify is great for writers (maybe not so great for musicians, though). If you feel the need to hear something, it’s there. I do sometimes have fun figuring out what my characters might like to listen to and then immerse myself in it as I write.

What are you working on at the moment?

I’ve got a couple of things on the go. I have the makings of a second Hull-set crime novel featuring Anna Stone and Luke Carver to follow on from “The Dead Can’t Talk”. Hull is the UK City of Culture next year, and for better or worse, it’s something that needs documenting on the page. I’m also working on a crime novel set in various locations around the north of England, so it’s exciting to be exploring new locations.

Thanks, Nick for taking part. Good luck with the writing.  Nick can be found on Twitter: @NickQuantrill  and at his website: http://nickquantrill.co.uk

 

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5 thoughts on “Music To Write Books By – Nick Quantrill

  1. Ha! In my yoof I could work to rock or even folk-rock music (the latter’s especially difficult because lyrics of writers like Leonard Cohen or Robin Williamson or Janis Ian or Steve Harley or Bob Dylan are constantly working their way into one’s mind, disrupting the flow of one’s own words!), but I can’t do that any longer — it’s classical, wordless music or nuffink (okay, the occasional piece of liturgical music if I’m feeling brave).

    I like the selection here, especially the Steve Earle.

    • Thanks, John. It’s a great selection, isn’t it? I can’t listen to anything with lyric either. It’s too off-putting. You’d be very welcome to take part in this series if you’re up for it!

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